Is manufacturing the key to the region’s future? 20/10/2016

A local businessman came to me with this story idea many months before the paper changed style. The then editor told me not to proceed as we were not doing features of this type and it was not “hard news”.

Great Southern Weekender, October 20, 2016, pp 8 and 9.

Great Southern Weekender, October 20, 2016, pp 8 and 9.

After a change of management we were required to produce a two-page feature in every edition, and suddenly this story became newsworthy.X20ALB_008-9P

As a journalist it is important to be able to tailor your writing to a publication’s subject matter. There is no merit in producing work that does not get published.

NB: I did not write the side panel.

 

Sporting tax thwarted 1/12/2016

It is tricky to explain the workings of a local council to newspaper readers when the issue is complex and councillors are deciding how to vote.

From The Great Southern Weekender, Thursday, December 1, 2016 p1 and 2.

From The Great Southern Weekender, Thursday, December 1, 2016 p1 and 2.

I think I was able to pull it off this time.X01ALB_002P

However this was not the end of the matter. One councillor decided to table a motion at the next meeting to reverse the decision, which is having an effect on the conduct of the current State Election. I will post the story when time permits.

 

Authorities unlikely to get any fire restitution 11/8/2016

This is an example of a story lead changing right on deadline.

X11ALB_003P

I had written about a judgement made against a young man who had started a bushfire and was ordered to pay a six-figure sum in damages.

I interviewed the fire control officer who was pleased with this result.

My editor had already put the story “on the page” when the man’s lawyer contacted me telling me his client could not be jailed for non-payment as it was a civil matter.

From The Great Southern Weekender Thursday, August 11, 2016.

Cultural centre Bedulu

Another draft chapter from my guide to Lempad’s Art and Buildings in Bali

Getting there:

Lempad's wall at the abandoned cultural centre in Bedulu, Bali.

Lempad’s wall at the abandoned cultural centre in Bedulu, Bali.

If you are staying in Ubud, go south down Jl Hanoman or Jl Cok Gde Rai for about two kilometres until you reach Jl Made Lebah/Jl Raya Teges and turn left.Travel east along a road that then changes its name from Jalan Raya Goa Gajah to Jalan Raya Bedulu and then Jalan Pura Samuan Tiga. Pass through an ornately carved stone gateway and travel along a dual carriageway to a paved car park. Pura Samuan Tiga temple is on the left and Lempad’s art is part of the neglected cultural centre on the right, just before the road narrows. As all of Lempad’s art is on the outside of this building there is no need to go inside and consequently no entry fee.

Several excellent but neglected examples of Lempad’s art can be seen at this now abandoned cultural centre. Lempad was commissioned to carve a bas relief into clay bricks for this Suharto-era building used by visiting politicians to address meetings. It has been reproduced in full colour in Gaspar, Casannovas and Couteau’s book “Lempad”. Continue reading

Yeh Puluh carvings

This is a draft chapter from my guide Lempad’s Art and Buildings in Bali.

Yeh Puluh temple ticket office, Jl Yeh Puluh, Bedulu, Bali.

Yeh Puluh temple ticket office, Jl Yeh Puluh, Bedulu, Bali.

This chapter does not direct you to any of Lempad’s own work, but to some much older art which is said to have had a life-long influence on him.

Getting there:

The Yeh Puluh carvings are on the way to Beduluh’s Yeh Puluh temple and you need to be reasonably steady on your feet to see them. At the end of Jalan Yeh Puluh is a car park and a little kiosk where you need buy a Rp 15,000 ticket unless you are Balinese and dressed in temple clothes. Continue reading